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Top Tips to Avoid Christmas Food Waste

Top Tips to Avoid Christmas Food Waste Header Image

Christmas is a time to get together with family and friends, celebrate the year behind us, and to look forward to the future. Another staple of Christmas is the food, and for all the wonderful roasts that are cooked over the festive period, there is unfortunately an excessive amount of food waste. 

We're here to show you that there is another way! Read along to find out how!

Plan Your Christmas


Most households tend to overbuy the amount of food they really need. Plan as much as you can in advance: how many people you need to feed, what their dietary requirements are, how much they typically tend to eat, etc. Once you have a good idea of this, you can calculate roughly how many of each food item you will likely need.

Reorganise your fridge and freezer in advance to make the most of the space available.

Don't Buy in Bulk Unless Necessary


Supermarkets will sell vegetables in bulk bags to make you feel as if you're saving money, the same applies for discounts or multi-buys. A lot of this bulk food ends up getting thrown away as it will rot before being used. Buying loose vegetables will encourage you to only buy what you need, plus you will save money too!

Communicate with relatives before the big day, so you can ensure they don't bring unneeded extra food.

If You Do Buy Too Much


If you do end up buying too much, you can always donate any excess food to a food bank or local charity. Food bank reliance is becoming more and more necessary, so donations are always welcome.

Christmas dinner leftovers can be reused for the days following Christmas: make bubble and squeak, turkey sandwiches, and so much more! If it's suitable, you can also freeze certain foods for use at a later date.

Recycle


Be aware of what your local council can take in terms of recycling, some ideas aren't as recyclable as you might think. Planning in advance will allow you to recycle correctly and make sure that items don't have to go to landfill unnecessarily.

You can also recycle your food waste by using a composter or wormery. Not only does this stop waste going to landfill, it also provides usable compost for your garden!

Quick Tips


  • Fridge too full? Take advantage of the cold weather and store food items outside. Just make sure they can' be reached by rodents!
  • Take photos of the inside of your fridge and freezer, that way you will always know exactly what you have in there, and won't end up overbuying.
  • Allow guests to choose how much they want to eat, serving a standard plate for every guest can cause food to go to waste as not everyone will eat the same amount.



Learn More About Worms on Geography Awareness Week

Learn More About Worms on Geography Awareness Week Header Image

This week marks the start of Geography Awareness Week, a week that highlights the importance of geography, and most importantly our place in the world and how we interact with our environment.

We'd like to take this chance to explore the topic of worms, and their geographical differences, some facts, and how they can you help you. Read along below!

Tiger Worms (Eisenia fetida)

tiger worms

Tiger Worms are native to Europe, but over time they have been introduced to every continent apart from Antarctica. They are ideal for use in wormeries because of their affinity for rotting vegetation. They are difficult to identify against other worms, but they are unlikely to be found in soil (unlike most worms), their bright yellow tail is usually a good indicator.

European Earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus)

European earthworm

Similar to the tiger worm, the European Earthworm is distributed worldwide, with very few locations not having at least a small population of them. Some people use them for composting but they are generally less effective than tiger worms.

Common Earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris)

common worm

The Common Earthworm, like it's name implies, is one of the most common worms found in the UK. They're spread across the globe but are considered an invasive pest in some countries, due to the decline of some native species. In the US they are sometimes known as Nightcrawlers. Due to their tendency to burrow, they aren't suited for composting.

Indian Blues (Perionyx excavatus)

Indian blue

Popular in Northern America and Australia, these worms are notable for their ability to create ultra fine worm castings very quickly (worm poo!). They are native to Asia and are much more commonly used for composting there.

African Nightcrawler (Eudrilus eugeniae)

African nightcrawler

Like the name suggests, this worm is native to Africa, they are typically twice the size of tiger worms but are just as useful for vermicomposting. These worms are typically better suited to more tropical climates, as they tend to struggle with severe temperature changes.

If you're looking to start your own Wormery we highly reccomend using tiger worms to get you started!

The Benefits of Composting

the benefits of composting header image

The Benefits of Composting

There are a number of ways to get involved with composting, from using a standard wooden composter, Wormery, hot composter, and more!


How To Compost

compost

  • First of all, you need a container to hold your compost (view our range here).

  • Secondly, you need a location. Different types of containers will work better in different environments, but generally you want a consistent temperature as much as possible.

  • Some composters are suitable for outdoors, such as larger wormeries and garden composters

  • If space is an issue you can also use a container design to be used indoors, such as a Bokashi Bin or similar items.

What To Put In It?

leaves

  • Generally a mix of brown and green materials is advised

  • Green materials includes kitchen waste, grass, and weeds

  • Brown materials includes wood, cardboard, and dead leaves

  • Lime can change the acidity of the composter if there is an imbalance

  • A wormery will need Tiger Worms in order to function

Maintaining It

compost pile

  • Depending on your type of composter, you may need to turn the materials inside of it to add air in to the mix

  • Some composters are designed with this in mind, and have functions to allow the turning more easily, such as the Maze 245 Litre Compost Tumbler

  • Wormeries have different needs to traditional composters, you can find out more about Wormeries here

Using Your Compost

growing

  • Once your compost is ready you can use it in a variety of ways

  • If you're growing vegetables and herbs, the compost can be placed around the base of these plants to ensure better and healthier growth

  • Adding compost to grass will maintain and improve a healthy lawn

  • Mix with soil for use with potted plants, adding additional nutrients to the plant

  • Flower beds can be improved with the addition of compost, giving the plants an extra boost

 

If you're looking for even more of a challenge, why not try building your own Wormery? We've got an entire guide to help you along the way, plus you can purchase extra wormsguides, and materials for your Wormery from our website

A Buying Guide for Our Wormeries

Our Wormeries

  Great for kids Great for flats New Bestseller Bestseller Bestseller For dog & cat waste For dog & cat waste
Inventors of the wormery - since 1980's Junior Wormery Midi Wormery Stainless Steel Wormery Original Wormery 3 Tray Tiger Wormery 4 Tray Tiger Wormery 3 Tray Pet Poo Wormery 4 Tray Pet Poo Wormery

Junior Wormery

Midi Wormery

Stainless Steel Indoor Wormery

Original Wormery

Multi Tray Tiger Wormery



Price £40 £49.99 £109.99 £64.99 £59.99 £70 £71.99 £82
Dimensions Diameter: 35cm
Height: 36cm
Diameter: 36cm
Height: 43cm
Diameter: 34cm
Height: 43cm

Height: 77cm

Width: 61cm
Depth: 44cm

Height: 53-74cm*
Width: 42cm
Depth: 42cm

*Height expands as compost builds

Height: 56-87cm*
Width: 42cm
Depth: 42cm

*Height expands as compost builds

Height: 53-74cm*
Width: 42cm
Depth: 42cm

*Height expands as compost builds

Height: 56-87cm*
Width: 42cm
Depth: 42cm

*Height expands as compost builds

Capacity 18 Litres 27 Litres 30 Litres 100 Litres 46.5 Litres 62 Litres  46.5 Litres 62 Litres
Suitable for 1 Person 1-2 People 2-3 People Family Family Family 1 Large or
3 Medium Dogs
 2 Large or
4-5 Medium Dogs
Colours Silver Silver Stainless Steel Silver Black
Green
Terracotta
Red
Purple
Blue
Black
Green
Terracotta
Red
Purple
Blue
Black
Green
Terracotta
Red
Purple
Blue
Black
Green
Terracotta
Red
Purple
Blue
Everything you need is included when you buy a Wormery
Tiger Worms, Lime Mix, Coir Block for Wormery Bedding & Instructions
Tiger Worms
or
Worm Voucher
Yes
250g
Yes
250g
Yes
250g
Yes
250g
Yes
250g
Yes
250g
Yes
250g
Yes
250g
Lime Mix Yes
1.5kg
Yes
1.5kg
Yes
1.5kg
Yes
1.5kg
Yes
1.5kg
Yes
1.5kg
Yes
1.5kg
Yes
1.5kg
Coir Block for Wormery Bedding Yes
650g
Yes
650g
Yes
650g
Yes
650g
Yes
650g
Yes
650g
Yes
650g
Yes
650g
Aeration Brass Vent Brass Vent Brass Vent Brass Vents Airflow Lid Airflow Lid Airflow Lid Airflow Lid
Drainage Drainage Platform Drainage Platform Stainless Steel Tray Platform Patented Drainage System Multi-Tray Drainage and Sloped Sump Tray Multi-Tray Drainage and Sloped Sump Tray Multi-Tray Drainage and Sloped Sump Tray Multi-Tray Drainage and Sloped Sump Tray
Ease of Harvesting Liquid Feed 5 Star 5 Star 5 Star 5 Star 5 Star 5 Star 5 Star 5 Star
Ease of Harvesting Compost 4 Star 4 Star 4 Star 4 Star 5 Star 5 Star 5 Star 5 Star
Rubberised Compression Lid Seal Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No
Expandable? No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes
Stand No No Yes
Built-In
Yes
Available
Yes
Included
Yes
Included
Yes
Included
Yes
Included
5 Year Guarantee Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Helpline Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
30 Day Money Back Guarantee Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Price £40 £49.99 £109.99 £64.99 £59.99 £70 £71.99 £82

How To Maintain Your Wormery Through Autumn

How to maintain your wormery through autumn

What problems do wormeries face in autumn?


Wetter and cooler weather could cause big problems for your wormery if you don’t take any measures to protect it from the elements. The biggest problems that wormeries face during the autumn months is the risk of your worms getting drowned or it is becoming too cold for them to effectively work. Autumn is the season in which temperatures drop and the rain doesn’t stop, this could lead to rain entering your wormery, especially if it is left outside without any shelter. So, it is vital that you keep an eye out to check how soggy your compost and waste is getting.

Another big problem wormery owners face is when the temperature drops as the worms struggle to cope with the cold. Worms work best in a constant temperature which isn’t too hot or too cold, ideally between 15 - 25oC. Therefore, during the autumn times, keeping your wormery outside is not advised.

Read more

Worm Trivia

Worm Trivia

10 facts you always wanted to know!

1.  If you cut a worm in half it will probably die, one 'half' may survive and regrow but you will not get two worms.

2. The only possibly reasonable negative or bad thing about a worm is that some humans don't like them- which is hardly the worms fault. Worms only eat dead organic matter. Nothing more and nothing less. This immediately puts them towards the very top of the list of beneficial and harmless life forms on the planet. We humans alas are towards the bottom.

Read more

How To Make A DIY Wormery

How To Make A DIY Wormery

Helpful advice for those of you feeling adventurous!


If you are reasonably competent at basic DIY projects and work then making a Wormery is not a daunting task. That said and as with so many DIY matters a little pre thought and planning goes a long way.

Perhaps the simplest approach is to start with a suitable plastic container such as an old waterbutt, dustbin or the like. However you can, of course, start from scratch and build your wormery from wood or other material depending upon availability and your expertise. Car tyres seem to be a popular choice but watch out for escapees!

The first issues to consider are about design and the following questions should be addressed :-



  1. Do you mind some worms escaping as long as the wormery works (Probably not sensible if located inside!)

  2. Would you be put off with flies in your wormery?

  3. How much of what type of waste do you want the wormery to cope with?


What follows assumes that you are starting with a suitable plastic bin or container ready for conversion. Even so the principles involved are applicable to a build from scratch approach.

If either (or both) of 1 and 2 above are important to you then you will need to consider how to make your wormery sealed yet sufficiently aerated to allow the worms to thrive. Depending upon your type of lid, then some judiciously applied draught excluder and some clips or weights to hold the lid closed should work well. For aeration the smallest holes you are likely to be able to drill will almost certainly permit the ingress of flies to your wormery and the egress of worms from it. The best answer is to drill several holes small holes and then edge stick a piece of gauze on the inside.

You now need to drill your tap hole and fix your tap. As with most design problems a compromise is required here. To maximise the liquid that can flow out of the tap without tilting the Wormery you want the tap as low as possible. On the other hand to harvest the liquid you want the tap accessible to a watering can or similar so want it located higher.

Our recommendation is to drill the tap hole so the centre is at least 1" (25mm) above the base of the bin and then to use bricks or blocks to raise the unit for easy access. A 25mm (1") diameter hole will be right for a standard plastic water butt tap.

Next is the vital matter of creating a separate platform that will keep worms and solids above whilst allowing the easy flow of liquid into the sump created beneath the separating tray. Getting this right is central to the functioning of your DIY Wormery.

Ideas for this include fine mesh supported on bricks; a cut to size piece of wood or plastic with holes drilled in again supported on bricks or the like. Another option is the suspension of a porous sack from the rim of the wormery so it hangs to about an inch above tap level. The choice is yours, but the simple objective is to facilitate good drainage and thus avoid water logging.

If you are looking to purchase a wormery instead of building one, you can do that by exploring our wormeries category. All of our wormeries include worms and the required components so you're ready to go!

Purple, Black and Red Wormeries

©Copyright 2021 - The Wormery is a trading name of GM8 Group Ltd. A company registered in England & Wales (company number 04414980)